IPv6 One Year In: Is Your Data Center Any More Efficient?

IPv6 One Year In: Is Your Data Center Any More Efficient?

One year after the date when the main carriers of data traffic on the Internet were encouraged to switch their IP address schemes from IPv4 to IPv6 permanently, the migration to a new way of counting hosts is actually on track.  Last year, the Internet Society told me that we’d be able to measure the real impact of the new address scheme on network performance — both on the small and large scales — in a few years’ time.

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The Enterprise Conversation We’re Afraid to Have

The Enterprise Conversation We’re Afraid to Have

If we’re being honest, the sweeping change that is supposedly transforming our workplace, our lives, and our society through the dissemination of smaller, more mobile, more connected devices has hit a stone wall... The problem is identity.  While more than 9 of 10 executives say they’re afraid of how cloud architectures will impact security, according to a poll our Hailey McKeefry cited last week, the truth is that we are reluctant to cross that line and enter the era where we trust our online identity to any outside institution.  I’ve been told that online identity is a social issue, not a business issue.  This is the crux of our denial: that who we are in public and how we work in business are not just separate issues but separate identities.

 

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The Long Road from ‘Big Data’ to Just ‘Data’

The Long Road from ‘Big Data’ to Just ‘Data’

In the absence of hard and factual definitions, “big data” becomes an ambiguous, vacuous marketing phrase left to blow in the wind, like “cloud computing” or “central intelligence.”  Inevitably, the concept gets filled from the outside, and folks become paranoid of the results.  An entire industry has consolidated around making you afraid of things you don’t understand, and the reason why is because it works.

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When Does a Student Become a ‘Hacktivist?’

When Does a Student Become a ‘Hacktivist?’

The case of Montreal college student Hamed Al-Khabaz [pictured left], expelled by Dawson College last November for having used vulnerability testing software on its Web servers without authorization, brings to a head all the myriad questions about lines being crossed, how, and when.  When is the use of commercial security software by outside actors considered “hacking?”  When is the discovery of a clear and present threat to students’ security considered, unto itself, a clear and present threat to students’ security?  If a security hole is obvious to a computer science student, is that student obligated to refrain from calling attention to it?

And as if those weren’t enough questions:  When should a service provider step in front of its client’s own public relations, and make “amends” for the repercussions that client’s policies may have on its own brand?

 

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Who Pays for BYOD? You Already Did

Who Pays for BYOD? You Already Did

As part of its second annual State of BYOD Report, Good Technology polled 98 of its enterprise customers to gauge the changes in BYOD adoption among businesses in the course of one year.  Its findings:  Even though 98 customers may be a small sample size, among those respondent companies that do have BYOD policies already in place, a staggering 93 percent expect their employees to end up paying some service costs, perhaps after stipends and compensation.  A full 50 percent don’t reimburse their employees whatsoever.

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Cloud Computing: Power Hog or Panacea?

Cloud Computing: Power Hog or Panacea?

Here's something we're still not thinking about, and I've written about this several times now:  As we shift computing to a utility model, the provider of computing becomes, to coin a phrase, a utility .  Which means it must serve as a power generator.  Now, several years ago, the U.S. Government concluded we need the virtual equivalent of a space program to solve the cloud data center power generator problem.  Then it stopped pursuing this further, which may as well be the epitaph of federal government itself in the 2010s.  Microsoft has said the cost of new power generators would be offset by the power savings to be gained from centralized data centers.  So we can get our $52 billion back in savings coupons?

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The Cloud Makes Security Smarter

The Cloud Makes Security Smarter

Security is not (thankfully) a service of anyone’s public relations department.  For once, the businesspeople who have their minds fine-tuned to this problem are asking the right questions.  The most important of these questions, in my opinion, is this:  If in every massive breach incident, the fault can be traced to design, then why can’t cloud architectures enable designs for a virtual envelope that have no practical correlation — that are physically impossible?

 

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